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J.Smith

name, rank and service

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Officers were always fun to train. I used to hear many joes complaining about the requirement to salute them, until

I told them how to have fun with it.just catch an officer coming out a door with both hands full and watch the fun as he tried to return your salute. or saluting a newbie fresh out of ROTC with your left hand,when done right it looks proper and the poor confused butter bar wouldn't know which hand to use

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You and a group of joes see an officer coming, so you spread out single file with about 10 feet or so between you. Well, you get the picture

Of course that works both ways. I was going to eat lunch and went to BK...which was where all the brand new butter-bars decided to go after OCS graduation. They were leaving, I was coming in.

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I had a great deal of fun during PLDC(sgt school) the school was run by nogos,they hadbeen having some problems with sgts who already wore rank giving the speedies a hard time, so they stripped us all of rank upon arrival giving us a small round button for our hatsinstead these things weresilver shiny chrome.

there was a drill instructor school next door and every time one of us walked past, we were saluted and you would always hear attenshon!

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Twinkle twinkle little bar, how I wish you were a silver star..........

Not in the military, don't plan to be, God Bless you people for keeping my bum safe.

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Guest Grayfox

pldc was cake. someone with a burlap sack over their head and hog tied in a phonebooth could pass the landnav course.

i passed pldc pretty easy and was on my way to promotion (and another tour) until i opened my trap and told my squadleader he had no balls... the fact that i said what i did in front of the platoon leader didnt help my case any either.

so i got demoted down to PFC (the fact i was married and had a kid on the way saved me from going ALL the way down) and did the 14/14 bit... then i was climbing back up when i was in a training accident that pretty much ruined any shot of me re-upping.

if i had the chance i would rejoin in a heartbeat... as an engineer again to boot... lotsa mines out there and someones gotta take them out

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quote:

Originally posted by Kiran:

You and a group of joes see an officer coming, so you spread out single file with about 10 feet or so between you. Well, you get the picture

Of course that works both ways. I was going to eat lunch and went to BK...which was where all the brand new butter-bars decided to go after OCS graduation. They were leaving, I was coming in.

That's a familiar story -- don't ever be walking past the medical section at 12:00 hours at Fort Sill. My God! Never seen so many officers in all my life! My arm got tired just passing that area, after all the saluting I got to do. Geez...

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Guest

No Dredd, just Officers, or if you are an officer, those officers that outrank you.

We enlisted guys get tired right arms sometimes from all that saluting. I know EXACTLY what you mean about Ft Sill. I was in that damn hospital for 2 weeks in basic training. Pulled achilles tendon, pink eye, and namonia, was NOT at all fun, but when I was wheeling around in that wheelchair, my right arm got real tired saluting every doctor in the place. MADE ME NUTS!!

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quote:

Originally posted by Jaguar:

No Dredd, just Officers, or if you are an officer, those officers that outrank you.

We enlisted guys get tired right arms sometimes from all that saluting. I know EXACTLY what you mean about Ft Sill. I was in that damn hospital for 2 weeks in basic training. Pulled achilles tendon, pink eye, and namonia, was NOT at all fun, but when I was wheeling around in that wheelchair, my right arm got real tired saluting every doctor in the place. MADE ME NUTS!!

To get around having to salute so much, I tended to over-load my arms so it was obvious that saluting was not a possibility. The officers hated it as much as us, from what I could tell. Duty is duty, but....

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Guest Grayfox

anyone ever try a sniper check with a disliked officer???

hehe i was notorious for that

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quote:

anyone ever try a sniper check with a disliked officer???

I got the s*** smoked out of me for that one!

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Yes officers have to return salutes. It's a military courtesy.

Sniper check....well, you're not SUPPOSED to salute an officer in the field because enemy snipers could see that and know who to kill....well, to do a sniper check, walk up to the nearest officer, render a salute and sound off with a loud and thunderous, "Sniper Check, SIR!" They really, really don't like that

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Guest Grayfox

yep... every unit has an officer no one likes. ours was the XO. we tortured that poor guy. vaseline on his HMMWV seat,super glue on the hummer door handle, kiwi polish on the PRC 77 mike, tobasco in the coffee... hell we even locked him in his office once... thatw as aside from doing random sniper checks

ahh memories

anyone ever try sending a butter bar up to the first sergeant and asking him for a PRC (pronounced prick) e-8???

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how about handing one of them an antenna off a hmmv(still attached) asking them to hold it then have someone inside key the mike

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quote:

anyone ever try sending a butter bar up to the first sergeant and asking him for a PRC (pronounced prick) e-8???

Ahhh...the cherry tricks...

How bout telling a new private to go get a box of grid squares?

Or go get the keys to the back 40?

or go get some chem-light batteries?

yep, that was some good laughs. I got smoked because I wasn't stupid enough to fall for them, go figure.

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Guest Grayfox

quote:

how about handing one of them an antenna off a hmmv(still attached) asking them to hold it then have someone inside key the mike

LMFAO!!!! oh that brought back some memories of having a cruit hold the leads of a TA-1 and then cranking it up...

what about the changing the summer air/winter air in the tires???

my whole platoon got rolled by the brigade commander (full bird). he was inspecting the motorpool when we had our butterbar jumping up and down on the 113 checking the shocks... for those that dont know a m113 weighs about 13 tons and its hardly likely a 200 pound man can move it by jumping on it...

funny stuff

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quote:

Originally posted by Kiran:

Yes officers have to return salutes. It's a military courtesy.

Sniper check....well, you're not SUPPOSED to salute an officer in the field because enemy snipers could see that and know who to kill....well, to do a sniper check, walk up to the nearest officer, render a salute and sound off with a loud and thunderous, "Sniper Check, SIR!" They really, really don't like that

Officers are supposed to salute, but it's not like you can take them to court if they don't.... Government Property has no rights, and gets to pay taxes...

Saluting in the field... One of the best ways to get rid of an (EDITED) officer is for the entire group to salute him while on a field mission. This is against regulations -- when the unit gets back to camp, the problem is proving it. There were a number of MIA officers in Viet Nam that no one seemed to know what happened to... Go figure....

When one of my Drill Sgts. told me to go find a box of grid squares, and I promptly tossed him a map, and told him, "Need some more, Drill Sgt.? Got plenty of maps...." He wasn't real happy with me, but I have to admit push-ups back then were good for the soul -- and the occasional smart mouth.

(Remember a raw recruit asking a different D.I. which ones he wanted -- The D.I. tossed him a pair of scissors and a map, and made him cut out all the squares on it.... Bet he either kept his trap shut or knew exactly what a grid square was from then on!)

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quote:

Officers are supposed to salute, but it's not like you can take them to court if they don't.... Government Property has no rights, and gets to pay taxes...


Bah, humbug. I got my CO to jump all over a 2LT that didn't feel like returning my salute!

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Guest

quote:

originally by Wolferz

how about handing one of them an antenna off a hmmv(still attached) asking them to hold it then have someone inside key the mike

That..... that..... that is just plain evil!!

I was a 31V, it was my job to test and maintain ALL communications equipment on base when I was in Turkey. We didn't have any of your puny VHF rigs with your fiberglass antennas, we had the big 250 watt HF jobs with the multipiece metal antenna that is like 12 feet long.

Anyway, it was my job to go out to the motorpool and give these things the once over every week.

First step is to grab whomever is in charge of that particular pickup and get him out there for the full monty so to speak.

So I take this Field artillery private out to his truck, and get him into the back with the radio, I tell him to check the rig and make sure it is secure, while I go over the antenna system. I reach down, unscrew the little holder for that damn 1 wire coax, check and make sure it's tight on the wire, reach up and start disassembling the antenna, next thing I know, my hand is burning, and it hurts like hell.

The little idiot that I told to make sure his rig was secure in it's mount had turned the damned thing on and was playing with the tuner, which of course sends out enough RF to fry a good sized mouse. I happened to be at the recieving end of that RF energy, I was nursing my right hand for over 2 weeks, and you couldn't tell that there was anything wrong with it.

RF burns are amazing, because they are not surface burns, they are in the muscle itself, and it is extremely painful.

Needless to say I chewed that private a new one, went to the medic, who of course could not do a thing for it except put me on light duty, and let it heal on it's own. He did give me some pain killer, but not nearly enough.

I got back at that idiot private too, but that's another story all together.

By the way Wolferz, How are you feeling there friend? I hope things are good.

[ 12-18-2002, 02:55 AM: Message edited by: Jaguar ]

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getting better every day, what's odd is I don't feel any worse for wear and tear LOL kind of like having a common cold,I think when this all startedIwas awakened from a sound sleep feeling like my rectum was coming off I went and sat on the throne where I broke out in a cold sweat and became very nauseated. next day my left arm and hand went away.weirdly enoughI don't seem to be suffering any dementia. maybe my brain was already dead before it was asphyxiated

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Let's see, had a butter bar looking all over the Company, then the Battalion areas for a box of grid squares.

Frequency grease was always a good one; it is the actual noun-nomenclature for silicon that was used to lube the ends of antennae elements (QE-254, RC-292, etc). That and a roll of order wire.

The there is the need a cable stretcher Lt. Usaully after we just got done running 10 reals (2.5 miles) of PCM cable and coming up 2 feet short at the end.

In the early dayz of tactical satellite communications (TACSAT) the quality of the links were not the greatest - lots of static and echo. Echo was easy to fix - peak this, tweak that. Static we could do nothing about because it was hard as heck to get authorization to increase power out wattage - damn GMF pukes. So I would tell my zeros that the static was due to bird wobble caused by the failure one of the 4 gyros in the satellite.

Then there is the ... hold these wires Lt (WD-1) so we can test the phone line ... and then crank the TA-312 or squeeze the TA-1; 90vdc real quick

But we only did this things to zeros we really liked. The zeros we didn't not like, we just got rid of

TTFN

[ 12-18-2002, 06:14 PM: Message edited by: Gallion ]

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We had this one SGT 1st Class who had just gotten out of a D.I. Unit. Thought he was the answer to all of our problems. We put up with his crap for about two weeks, before we got my 1st LT to sit back and watch. By the time he got done with that SGT 1st CLass, our maintenance bay was in tip-top shape. Through no help of our own -- the LT made him do it by himself.

He chilled out good and proper after that....

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