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quote:

Originally By Brad Lemley on Discovery.com:

If a 175-pound man fell into one end, he would come out the other end as 38 pounds of oil, 7 pounds of gas, and 7 pounds of minerals, as well as 123 pounds of sterilized water.

Finally, we have some good use for people like Zacarias Moussaoui and Scott Peterson

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How long before these guys end up like Karen Silkwood? No way the big oil companies let this happen, no friggin way.

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Actually Race, from what I understand, they are actually pumping money into it right now.

It's cheaper to get oil this way then drilling for it, and the more profitable it is, the better. The oil companies want a piece of this and therefore they are backing it.

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I still remember that thing about the electric wheel-motor that Hydro-Qu├®bec developped and had already made a few working prototypes, supposed to change everything soon, only to get tanked by the big oil companies ... oh well

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quote:

Originally posted by Gallion:

Wonder how much oil it takes to produce oil from offal?

TTFN

quote:

here it is

"This plant will make 10 tons of gas per day, which will go back into the system to make heat to power the system," he says. "It will make 21,000 gallons of water, which will be clean enough to discharge into a municipal sewage system. Pathological vectors will be completely gone. It will make 11 tons of minerals and 600 barrels of oil, high-quality stuff, the same specs as a number two heating oil."


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quote:

Originally posted by Gallion:

Wonder how much oil it takes to produce oil from offal?

The real question is: Does it take more or less energy to produce a barrel of market ready offal oil when compared to producing it's conterpart from crude oil?

Although I'm a programmer, I'm employed by a waster water treatment plant. I'll be very interested to see how this pans out.

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quote:

Originally posted by Tyrn:

Does it take more or less energy to produce a barrel of market ready offal oil when compared to producing it's conterpart from crude oil?

From what I remember reading, they were saying that it takes aproximately 15BTU's to produce 100BTU's of energy, so that's pretty damned efficient.

Supposedly, within 5yrs or so, they will have it to where it's significantly less expensive than extracting it out of the ground.

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quote:

Originally posted by Race Bannon IV:

No way the big oil companies let this happen, no friggin way.

Big oil companies have to pay Billions of dollars to get rid of not only the toxic wastes that are produced from their refineries, but also the sludge that is left over from extracting the oil. Also, Oil & Gas companies still own the mineral rights to vast areas of land that they've extracted oil or gas, but the remaining shale in certain areas is too contaminated by other vectors for them to extact usable energy from them.

Considering the fact that this technology uses very similar plumbing, machines and procedures to what the Oil & Gas companies are already using, why in the world whould they NOT want to plug this into their system to make them not only more efficient, but to take the EPA and other environmental groups off their backs??? Are you kidding me, they will be one of the biggest benificiary's of this technology!

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quote:

Originally posted by Jaguar:

Actually Race, from what I understand, they are actually pumping money into it right now.

It's cheaper to get oil this way then drilling for it, and the more profitable it is, the better. The oil companies want a piece of this and therefore they are backing it.

I have to agree. Oil companies have nothing to lose, it doesn't matter where the oil comes from, as long as THEY are selling it, they are happy.

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This technology has existed for some time and has the POTENTIAL to POSSIBLY alleviate some of society's demand for oil; however, this process cannot produce all the compounds available from crude oil, namely the long chain hydrocarbons used in making wax, plastics, and tar.

(Warning Hawthorne sentence!)

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You're right about that IceCold, and the fact that you can practically throw anything into this process and get something useful out of it, is the greatest thing about it.

Put one of these things at EVERY landfill there is, talk about recycling!!

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It certainly would alleviate the dependence on foreign oil. I hope it works.

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quote:

Originally posted by Jaguar:

the fact that you can practically throw anything into this process and get something useful out of it,.....Put one of these things at EVERY landfill

I kind of read between the lines and surmised that they need to fine tune this thing for whatever type of waste they are throwing into it. I'm not sure if they can set it up to generically handle everything, at least that's not the feeling that I got from the article. But with that said, if you install one of these things at every:

Refinery, Slaughterhouse, Papermill, Recycling Center, Manufacturing Plant, Sewage Treatment Center, Tire dump, Medical Waste Center... pretty much anyplace where you pretty much know the types of waste that you will be getting, then we would definitly get a much better handle on whatever is ending up in the landfills and we can significantly reduce that, while turning a liability into an asset!

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This technology is being implemented by the butterball turkey plant to convert waste entrails to useful mineral fertilizer and natural gas. There was an article in Discover? magazine a few months ago where they discussed this. The inventor claims that this apparatus could be as large as a warehouse or small enough to fit on the back of a pickup truck. The smaller the unit, the less material it can process per day. This is promising in that, as Jaguar said, any carbon based compound can be processed by this procedure. Essentially, all household waste is carbon based thus a personal sized unit could use your garbage to heat your house. The procedure can even be used to destroy harmful chemical and biological agents for it breaks down the compounds at the molecular level. It is truly ingenious for it uses predominantly existing and proven technologies in its design

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The possibilities are astounding! Imagine never again paying to have household garbage hauled away. Instead an oil truck comes and pays you for your oil once a month. no more sewer bills. they would be paying us to take a dump.

And like Jag said . heating your home and cooking your food with grass clippings. I can see every home in America having a backyard TDP.

For the oil billionaires in the middle east, sorry about your luck fellas. but we don't need your steenking oil anymore. We'll give you $5.00 a barrel take it or leave it. No wait, make that a buck fifty.

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There are huge potential near term practical uses:

Sewage treatment: We (my employer) produce recycled water (~65 mgd) that is almost agricultural grade (it is perfect for landscaping and other non-human consumption needs), we also produce Class B sludge which is converted into high quality compost and methane which we use to generate ~60% of our internal power needs. We'll ignore the grit that's hauled to landfills for now. Using this system instead we could produce STERILE water and other non-hazardous byproducts (if I'm reading the article correctly). Sterile water is drinkable water and in a desert state (Utah) that's highly significant.

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The water is clean enough to be discharged to a processing facility. Even though the pathogens are gone, the chemical pollutants still must be seperated before it can be used.

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quote:

Originally posted by IceCold:

The water is clean enough to be discharged to a processing facility. Even though the pathogens are gone, the chemical pollutants still must be seperated before it can be used.

yeah but half the work is already done.

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